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PPPL collaborates in fusion experiments conducted by research institutions around the world. Such collaborations include supplying diagnostic equipment to ITER, a joint venture of the European Union, the United States and five other countries that is under construction in the south of France to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power.

PPPL and Max Planck physicists reveal experimental verification of a key source of fast reconnection of magnetic fields

Magnetic reconnection, a universal process that triggers solar flares and northern lights and can disrupt cell phone service and fusion experiments, occurs much faster than theory says that it should. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Germany’s Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics have discovered a source of the speed-up in a common form of reconnection. Their findings could lead to more accurate predictions of damaging space weather and improved fusion experiments.

PPPL and Max Planck physicists reveal experimental verification of a key source of fast reconnection of magnetic fields

Magnetic reconnection, a universal process that triggers solar flares and northern lights and can disrupt cell phone service and fusion experiments, occurs much faster than theory says that it should. Now researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Germany’s Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics have discovered a source of the speed-up in a common form of reconnection. Their findings could lead to more accurate predictions of damaging space weather and improved fusion experiments.

Top 10 PPPL stories that you shouldn’t miss

The past year saw many firsts in experimental and theoretical research at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Here, in no particular order, are 10 of the Laboratory’s top findings in 2016, from the first results on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade to a new use for Einstein’s theory of special relativity to modeling the disk that feeds the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.

1. First results of the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U)

Scientists develop a path toward improved high-energy accelerators

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with researchers in South Korea and Germany, have developed a theoretical framework for improving the stability and intensity of particle accelerator beams. Scientists use the high-energy beams, which must be stable and intense to work effectively, to unlock the ultimate structure of matter.  Physicians use medical accelerators to produce beams that can zap cancer cells.

Scientists develop a path toward improved high-energy accelerators

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with researchers in South Korea and Germany, have developed a theoretical framework for improving the stability and intensity of particle accelerator beams. Scientists use the high-energy beams, which must be stable and intense to work effectively, to unlock the ultimate structure of matter.  Physicians use medical accelerators to produce beams that can zap cancer cells.

PPPL and Max Planck physicists confirm the precision of magnetic fields in the most advanced stellarator in the world

Physicist Sam Lazerson of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with German scientists to confirm that the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) fusion energy device called a stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, produces high-quality magnetic fields that are consistent with their complex design.

PPPL and Max Planck physicists confirm the precision of magnetic fields in the most advanced stellarator in the world

Physicist Sam Lazerson of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with German scientists to confirm that the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) fusion energy device called a stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, produces high-quality magnetic fields that are consistent with their complex design.

PPPL scientists present key results at the 58th annual meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

More than 100 scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Laboratory (PPPL) joined nearly 2,000 others from around the world in San Jose, California, to discuss the latest findings in plasma science and fusion research. PPPL physicists contributed to papers, talks and presentations ranging from astrophysical plasmas to magnetic fusion energy during the 58th annual meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Plasma Physics.

PPPL scientists present key results at the 58th annual meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

More than 100 scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Laboratory (PPPL) joined nearly 2,000 others from around the world in San Jose, California, to discuss the latest findings in plasma science and fusion research. PPPL physicists contributed to papers, talks and presentations ranging from astrophysical plasmas to magnetic fusion energy during the 58th annual meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Plasma Physics.

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